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Second find of body remains made at Concordia wreck

Civil Protection Chief says identities await DNA exam

02 October, 15:22
Second find of body remains made at Concordia wreck (ANSA) - Massa, October 2 - More body remains have been found at the Costa Concordia shipwreck after bones were found last Thursday, Civil Protection Chief Franco Gabrielli said on Wednesday. Gabrielli said the identities of both sets of remains are awaiting the results of DNA examination.

When asked if the first find had been identified, Gabrielli said in the Tuscan coastal town of Massa, where he was attending a Civil Protection event, that: ''We are awaiting the results of scientific analyses. Among other things, other (remains) have been found that are under DNA examination. Beyond jumping to easy conclusions, we must wait for the results which will or will not give confirmation of the remains of the missing''. Doubts remained over the weekend about whether bones found at the site of the massive cruise-ship wreck last Thursday were from one of the two bodies still missing after the January 2012 disaster which killed 32, after sources close to the disaster commissioner's office said they were not.

''It is still not possible to say they are of human origin, still less to say they belong to someone in particular,'' the commissioner had said.

The bodies of Italian passenger Maria Grazia Tricarichi and Indian crew member Russel Rebello are still missing.

The other 30 corpses were recovered soon after the huge cruiseliner went down after hitting a rock off Tuscany's Giglio Island.

DNA tests are being carried out in a hospital in Grosseto, the largest nearby city.

The lurching, semi-submerged wreck of the Concordia was finally hauled upright upright last month, making the search for the bodies and new inspections possible. ''In the next few days, we will terminate the inspection of the (ship's) bottom and we will begin that of the interiors.

They are complicated places,'' Gabrielli said.

The cruiser's carcass will be floated and towed away next year.

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